This Week in the American Civil War: December 14-20, 1864

Posted by: on Dec 15, 2014 | No Comments

Information courtesy of the Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force
Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday December 14, 1864
In Nashville, Tennessee, Federal Major General George H. Thomas informed officials in Washington that the ice had melted and that he would attack the Confederate Army of Tennessee the next day. Field orders for the advance were issued.

In Georgia, Federal naval units began their week-long bombardment of Forts Rosedew and Beaulieu on the Vernon River.

Skirmishing occurred on the Germantown Road near Memphis, Tennessee, and in the Cypress Swamp near Cape Girardeau, Missouri.

Confederate President Jefferson Davis deferred to General Robert E. Lee’s judgment as to whether troops could be spared from Petersburg to operate against Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s forces.

Thursday December 15, 1864
BATTLE OF NASHVILLE
Federal Major General George H. Thomas’s Army of the Cumberland, having been recently reinforced by elements of the Sixteenth Corps which arrived two weeks earlier from Missouri, came out of their works in a heavy fog and struck Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s Army of Tennessee. The Federal force, totaling 35,000 troops, attacked the thin Confederate left flank, carried redoubts and then successfully assaulted Montgomery Hill and drove the enemy from the main defensive line to a position about a mile to the rear along the Brentwood Hills. Hood had been beaten back but still held the main road to Franklin. Both sides made troop adjustments during the night and Hood made the effort to shorten his line. When Thomas notified officials in Washington, Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant canceled his plans to go farther than Washington.

Friday December 16, 1864
BATTLE OF NASHVILLE CONTINUES
At 6 a.m. in rain and sleet, Federal troops on the left pressed back the Confederate right on the Franklin Pike to the main entrenchments, but Lieutenant General Stephen D. Lee’s corps held. The Federals completed their alignment for battle south of Nashville and the movement against the Confederate left flank continued along Granny White Pike. Late in the afternoon, after a heavy artillery bombardment, the main Federal assault commenced. Making their way up the Confederate left flank at Shy’s Hill, Federal Brigadier General John McArthur’s division, including the 5th, 7th, 9th and 10th Minnesota Infantry regiments, made their way up the Confederate left flank at Shy’s (formerly Compton’s) Hill, which gave way, forcing the center of the Confederate lines to fall back. The now-broken Confederates withdrew in confusion and Hood retreated. The Federal losses amounted to 387 killed, 2,562 wounded and 112 missing for a total of 3,061 out of approximately 55,000 engaged. Confederate losses are unknown but believed to be about 1,500 out of less than 30,000 troops available. The fight for Nashville was the last major battle in the Western Theater. Though the Confederate Army of Tennessee was decimated both at Nashville and at Franklin, two weeks prior, it was not destroyed.

Saturday December 17, 1864
Federal Major General James H. Wilson’s cavalry and some infantry led the Federal pursuit of Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood and the Army of Tennessee from Nashville. Hood managed to concentrate towards Columbia, encamping at Spring Hill. Skirmishing broke out between the Federals and Hood’s rear guard at Hollow Tree Gap, West Harpeth River, and Franklin. The rear guard action allowed the rest of the Confederates to withdraw through Franklin.

Sunday December 18, 1864
Major General James H. Wilson’s Federal cavalry in Tennessee pursued Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s Army of Tennessee as far as Rutherford Creek, north of Columbia, which was impassable.

The only recorded fighting for the day occurred at Spring Hill, Tennessee; and on Little River in New Madrid County, Missouri.

Hearing the news of the Battle of Nashville, people throughout both North and South realized that it was a serious blow to Confederate hopes.

Confederate Lieutenant General William J. Hardee refused Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s surrender request at Savannah, Georgia, that Sherman had issued the previous day. However, it was clear that the city had to be evacuated before the escape route to the north closed. General P.G.T. Beauregard was with Hardee at the moment and urged evacuation at once, even though Hardee seemed reluctant to leave.

The Congress and President of the United States engaged in continuing discussions that concerned reconstruction of the seceded states.

Monday December 19, 1864
Major General James H. Wilson’s Federal cavalry attempted to ford the flooded Rutherford Creek, north of Columbia, Tennessee. Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood hoped to halt his retreat at Columbia, on the line of the Duck River. Skirmishing broke out at Rutherford Creek and Curtis Creek.

In Virginia, Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early and Federal Major General Phil Sheridan dispatched troops from the Shenandoah Valley back to the Richmond-Petersburg front.

At Washington, D.C., President Abraham Lincoln issued a call for 300,000 more volunteers to replace casualties.

Tuesday December 20, 1864
CONFEDERATES EVACUATE SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
The Federal left at Savannah, Georgia moved slowly to cut off Confederate Lieutenant General William J. Hardee’s escape route across the Savannah River into South Carolina, but they did not succeed. Hardee, urged by General P.G.T. Beauregard and others to evacuate, finally left the area. Without opposition, he headed northward towards concentration with other Confederate units. Hardee left behind 250 heavy guns and larage amounts of cotton, but with an ingenious pontoon bridge of 30 rice flats, he was able to evacuate all of his 10,000 troops. The loss of the important port city was another psychological blow to the Confederates, still stinging from the defeat at Nashville earlier in the week.

Federal Major General George H. Thomas’s troops, following up Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s retreat in Tennessee, constructed a floating bridge over Rutherford Creek and pushed on for Columbia where they found the bridges destroyed and the Confederates across the Duck River. Some skirmishing occurred near Columbia.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of December 14-20, 1864
Active units:

1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Savannah, Georgia until December 21, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Duvall’s Bluff, Arkansas until May 13, 1865.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Savannah, Georgia until December 21, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On pursuit of Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s forces to the Tennessee River until December 28, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On provost duty at St. Louis, Missouri until January 29, 1865.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On pursuit of Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s forces to the Tennessee River until December 28, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Murfreesboro, Tennessee until January 19, 1865.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On pursuit of Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s forces to the Tennessee River until December 28, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On pursuit of Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s forces to the Tennessee River until December 28, 1864.

11th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Assigned to duty guarding the line of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad from Nashville to the Kentucky line. Companies E, G, and I were at Gallatin, Tennessee. Company A was at Buck Lodge. Company B at Edgefield Junction. Company C at Richland. Company D at Sandersville. Company H was at Mitchellsville. The location of companies F and K are unknown at this time. The regiment remained on duty at these locations until June 25, 1865.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – Engaged in frontier and patrol duty between Forts Wadsworth, Abercrombie, Ripley and Ridgely with headquarters at Fort Snelling, until November 17, 1865.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Engaged in frontier and patrol duty between Forts Wadsworth, Abercrombie, Ripley and Ridgely with headquarters at Fort Snelling until May 1866.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie. Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina. Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Heavy Artillery Battery – Organized at St. Paul and Rochester until February 1865.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty in Savannah, Georgia until December 21, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty as infantry at Fort Irwin, Defenses of Chattanooga until March 30, 1865.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections on duty at Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Fort Sisseton until May 1865.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I – Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units:
1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.

This Week in the American Civil War: December 7-13, 1864

Posted by: on Dec 8, 2014 | No Comments

Information courtesy of the Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force
Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday December 7, 1864
Federal military authorities were upset over Major General George H. Thomas’s failure to attack Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s Army of Tennessee at Nashville, Tennessee. Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant told Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton that if Thomas did not attack promptly, he should be removed.

At Murfreesboro, Tennessee, fighting was fairly severe as Confederates under Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest demonstrated against the Federal outpost.

Thursday December 8, 1864
Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s army could almost smell the sea as the changing terrain and vegetation indicated that they were close to accomplishing their goal. Skirmishing flared at Ebenezer Creek and Bryan Court House, Georgia.

Fearing that Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood would make his way across the Ohio River, Federal Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant told Major General Henry Halleck that Major General George H. Thomas ought to hand of his command to Major General John M. Schofield. Halleck deferred to Grant in making the decision but no change was made.

Friday December 9, 1864
Skirmishing broke out at the Ogeechee Canal, Cuyler’s Plantation and Monteith Swamp, Georgia; and around Hatcher’s Run, Virginia.

Federal Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant issued an order replacing Major General George H. Thomas with Major General John M. Schofield, but suspended the order when Thomas informed him that he intended to attack the next day. Thomas also blamed the delay on necessary concentrations of men, horses and supplies.

Saturday December 10, 1864
The marching part of Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s Georgia Campaign came to a close as the army arrived in front of Savannah. Sherman had determined not to assault the city but chose to invest it instead, as his army had not made contact with the naval supply vessels offshore. Immense amounts of forage were needed daily and all nearby feed was used up, which caused the horses to suffer.

A Confederate steamer, Ida, was captured and burned on the Savannah River, and a skirmish occurred at Springfield, Georgia.

Bad weather further delayed the planned Federal assault at Nashville as any movement was hazardous.

President Abraham Lincoln named Major General William F. Smith and Henry Stanbery as special commissioners to investigate civil and military affairs on and west of the Mississippi River.

Sunday December 11, 1864
Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s troops were busy investing Savannah, Georgia, although the route north to Charleston was not cut off yet. The lengthy King’s Bridge over the Ogeechee River, the direct route to Fort McAllister, had to be rebuilt as it was damaged by Confederates.

Federal Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant again urged Major General George H. Thomas to attack the Confederates at Nashville and was assured that he would as soon as the weather improved.

Monday December 12, 1864
The Federal army was at Savannah, Georgia getting its lines set for enveloping the city and in preparation for attack on Fort McAllister, the last barrier to contact with the U.S. Naval fleet. The Federals captured another Confederate vessel, the C.S.S. Resolute, on the Savannah River.

Federal Major General George H. Thomas informed Major General Henry Halleck in Washington that he was poised for attack against Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s Army of Tennessee at Nashville once the sleet melted, as it was almost impossible to move on the ice-covered ground.

Confederate President Jefferson Davis was still looking for troops to oppose Sherman at Savannah without weakening the position of General Robert E. Lee at Petersburg, Virginia.

Tuesday December 13, 1864
Federal Major General William T. Sherman made contact with the U.S. Navy fleet after the capture of Fort McAllister on the Ogeechee River below Savannah, Georgia. The small Confederate garrison under Major G.W. Anderson numbered only 230 men and suffered 35 casualties in the assault. The Federals sustained a loss of 24 killed and 110 wounded. Sherman’s army could now resupply and contact with officials in Washington was reestablished.

In Nashville, Tennessee, both Federal Major General George H. Thomas and Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood waited out the sleet storm. Federal Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant ordered Major General John A. Logan to proceed to Nashville and replace Thomas if the attack had not commenced by Logan’s arrival. Grant then headed to Washington with the intention of going to Nashville himself if needed.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of December 7-13, 1864
Active units:
1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Savannah, Georgia until December 21, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Duvall’s Bluff, Arkansas until May 13, 1865.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Savannah, Georgia until December 21, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Nashville, Tennessee until December 15, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On provost duty at St. Louis, Missouri until January 29, 1865.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Nashville, Tennessee until December 15, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Murfreesboro, Tennessee until January 19, 1865.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Nashville, Tennessee until December 15, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Nashville, Tennessee until December 15, 1864.

11th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Assigned to duty guarding the line of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad from Nashville to the Kentucky line. Companies E, G, and I were at Gallatin, Tennessee. Company A was at Buck Lodge. Company B at Edgefield Junction. Company C at Richland. Company D at Sandersville. Company H was at Mitchellsville. The location of companies F and K are unknown at this time. The regiment remained on duty at these locations until June 25, 1865.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – Engaged in frontier and patrol duty between Forts Wadsworth, Abercrombie, Ripley and Ridgely with headquarters at Fort Snelling, until November 17, 1865.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Engaged in frontier and patrol duty between Forts Wadsworth, Abercrombie, Ripley and Ridgely with headquarters at Fort Snelling until May 1866.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie. Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina. Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Heavy Artillery Battery – Organized at St. Paul and Rochester until February 1865.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty in Savannah, Georgia until December 21, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty as infantry at Fort Irwin, Defenses of Chattanooga until March 30, 1865.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections on duty at Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Fort Sisseton until May 1865.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I – Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units:
1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.

This Week in the American Civil War: November 30 – December 6, 1864

Posted by: on Dec 1, 2014 | No Comments

Information courtesy of the Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force
Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday November 30, 1864
BATTLE OF FRANKLIN
Leading units of the retreating Federals of Major General John Schofield’s force under Major General Jacob D. Cox arrived at Franklin, Tennessee, about dawn. They formed a defensive line south of the town and the Harpeth River. Schofield wished to hold Franklin until he could repair the bridges and get his trains across. Stung by the lost opportunity at Spring Hill, Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood moved rapidly towards Franklin on the main pike. A skirmish at Thompson’s Station, south of town, and other Federal delaying moves slowed the Confederate advance.

About 4 p.m., Hood, from Winstead Hill, ordered a massive frontal attack against the entrenched Federals on the southern edge of Franklin. The Confederates pressed ahead, carrying the forward works of the enemy, though suffering heavily in the process. After a near break which caused a 200-yard gap in the lines, the Federals rallied on the interior lines. Some of the bloodiest and most tragic fighting of the entire Civil War occurred in front of the Carter House as the battle lasted into the night. Schofield’s troops held and Hood’s force was driven back.

The Confederates lost six generals – Patrick Cleburne, States Rights Gist, H.B. Granbury, John Adams, O.F. Strahl were all killed outright and John C. Carter was mortally wounded. With more than 20,000 troops engaged, the Confederate losses amounted to 1,750 killed, 3,800 wounded and 702 missing for a loss of 6,252. Schofield engaged approximately 25,000 troops and lost 189 killed, 1,033 wounded and 1,104 missing for an aggregate total of 2,326.

During the night, Schofield pulled his battered units across the Harpeth River and headed north to Nashville to meet up with Major General George H. Thomas and receive reinforcements.

Thursday December 1, 1864
The Federal troops of Major General John M. Schofield had successfully withdrawn from Franklin, Tennessee and were now taking their places in the Nashville defense lines of Major General George H. Thomas. The Federals formed a rough semi-circle south of the city with both flanks resting on the Cumberland River. Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s weary Army of Tennessee moved upon Nashville with little pause to take care of the casualties or reorganize after the fateful toll extracted at Franklin the previous day.

A little more than halfway between Atlanta and Savannah, Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s army faced little difficulty as they approached Millen, Georgia, the site of a prison camp for Northern soldiers. Rumors abounded that the Federals were heading towards Andersonville, far to the south, to free the prisoners there.

In Washington, James Speed of Kentucky was appointed Attorney General by President Abraham Lincoln, succeeding Edward Bates who had resigned.

Friday December 2, 1864
Advance units of Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s Army of Tennessee approached the Federal lines at Nashville, Tennessee, and then established their own lines south of the city.

Federal Major General Granville Dodge was named to replace Major General William Rosecrans as commander of the Department of Missouri. Rosecrans long had experienced difficulty with the various divided political forces in Missouri and had proved inept in the administration of his command.

Saturday December 3, 1864
With both sides dug in at Nashville, that front was at a standstill, though Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant and Federal officials in Washington were urging Major General George H. Thomas to attack.

All of Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s corps in Georgia began to march toward Savannah. As they neared the coast, the country grew more sandy and then tended to marshes and creeks. The soldiers lived off the country and their destruction of property continued. Resistance was light.

In Washington, President Abraham Lincoln worked on his annual message to Congress and discussed the possibility with key advisors about naming Salmon P. Chase as Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Sunday December 4, 1864
Skirmishing occurred at Waynesborough, Statesborough, Lumpkin’s Station, at the Little Ogeechee River, all in Georgia, and at Station No. 5 on the Georgia Central Railroad. Other skirmishes were fought at White’s Station and Bell’s Mills, Tennessee; on the New Texas Road near Morganza, Louisiana; near Davenport Church, Virginia; and Federals fought Indians on Cow Creek near Fort Zarah, Kansas.

Monday December 5, 1864
At Nashville, Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood sent Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest’s cavalry and a division of infantry towards Murfreesboro.

Minor skirmishing occurred at the Little Ogeechee River and at Dalton, both in Georgia.

The Congress of the United States gathered for the second session of the 38th Congress.

Tuesday December 6, 1864
Former Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase was named Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, succeeding the deceased Roger B. Taney. Although President Abraham Lincoln had difficulties with Chase during his Cabinet years, the President placed Chase at the head of the list for the Supreme Court vacancy since Taney’s death.

Following the custom of the day, President Lincoln submitted his annual message to Congress, where it was read to the highly interested members, for all were aware of the momentous questions of war and reconstruction facing the Union.

Federal Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant issued new orders to Major General George H. Thomas at Nashville in which Thomas was to attack Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood “at once.”

Skirmishing occurred at Bell’s Mills, Tennessee; Lewisburg, Arkansas; and Hopkinsville, Kentucky.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of November 30 – December 6, 1864
Active units:
1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Participated in Major General William T. Sherman’s “March to the Sea” until December 10, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Duvall’s Bluff, Arkansas until May 13, 1865.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Participated in Major General William T. Sherman’s “March to the Sea” until December 10, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Nashville, Tennessee until December 15, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On provost duty at St. Louis, Missouri until January 29, 1865.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Nashville, Tennessee until December 15, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Participated in the Siege of Murfreesboro, Tennessee until December 12, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Nashville, Tennessee until December 15, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Nashville, Tennessee until December 15, 1864.

11th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Assigned to duty guarding the line of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad from Nashville to the Kentucky line. Companies E, G, and I were at Gallatin, Tennessee. Company A was at Buck Lodge. Company B at Edgefield Junction. Company C at Richland. Company D at Sandersville. Company H was at Mitchellsville. The location of companies F and K are unknown at this time. The regiment remained on duty at these locations until June 25, 1865.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – Engaged in frontier and patrol duty between Forts Wadsworth, Abercrombie, Ripley and Ridgely with headquarters at Fort Snelling, until November 17, 1865.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Engaged in frontier and patrol duty between Forts Wadsworth, Abercrombie, Ripley and Ridgely with headquarters at Fort Snelling until May 1866.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie. Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina. Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Heavy Artillery Battery – Organized at St. Paul and Rochester until February 1865.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – Participated in Major General William T. Sherman’s “March to the Sea” until December 10, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty as infantry at Fort Irwin, Defenses of Chattanooga until March 30, 1865.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections on duty at Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Fort Sisseton until May 1865.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I – Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units:
1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.