Off To Nashville

Posted by: on Nov 18, 2014 | No Comments

Members of the Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force depart from the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul, MN on Nov. 13, 2014 en route for the Shy’s Hill Marker dedication in Nashville, TN.

This Week in the American Civil War: November 16-22, 1864

Posted by: on Nov 17, 2014 | No Comments

Information courtesy of the Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force
Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday November 16, 1864
Federal Major General William T. Sherman left Atlanta signaling the start of a new campaign in Georgia. Since he cut communication with the rear, officials in the North would hear little from him for the weeks to come. Skirmishing occurred at Lovejoy’s Station, Bear Creek Station and Cotton River Bridge.

On the Tennessee River in northern Alabama, skirmishes occurred along Shoal Creek as Confederate Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest brought his cavalry in from Corinth, Mississippi to join Lieutenant General John Bell Hood at Tuscumbia and Florence.

Thursday November 17, 1864
Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s troops headed east and south towards the Georgia coast, taking four routes to confuse the enemy. However, there was not much left of an enemy to confuse. Skirmishing increased in northern Alabama with fighting near Maysville and New Market.

Confederate President Jefferson Davis wrote to a group of Georgia state senators expressing strong objection to any suggested possibility of separate state action for peace negotiations.

Friday November 18, 1864
Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s army marched between the Ocmulgee and Oconee rivers in Georgia. Sherman himself was with the left wing of his army.

Heavy storms delayed Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s advance into Tennessee.

Skirmishing occurred at Fayette, Missouri and Kabletown, West Virginia.

Saturday November 19, 1864
Governor Joe Brown of Georgia called for men between the ages of 16 and 55 to oppose Federal Major General William T. Sherman, but to no significant avail.

President Abraham Lincoln ordered the blockade to be lifted at Norfolk, Virginia; Fernandia, Florida; and Pensacola, Florida.

Federals fought Indians near Plum Creek Station, Nebraska Territory, and a skirmish took place at Duckett’s Plantation near Paint Rock River, Alabama.

Sunday November 20, 1864
Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s advancing army skirmished with cavalry, militia and other troops at Clinton, Walnut Creek, East Macon and Griswoldville, Georgia. Other Federals skirmished with Indians at Fort Zarah, Kansas.

Monday November 21, 1864
Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood moved his Army of Tennessee from Florence, Alabama and headed for Tennessee. Major General Benjamin F. Cheatham’s corps led the Confederate advance going as far as Rawhide, Alabama. Lieutenant Generals Stephen D. Lee and Alexander P. Stewart followed, along with Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest’s cavalry. In all, the Confederates advanced 30,000 infantry and 8,000 cavalry on the march into Tennessee.

Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s forces defeated Georgia state troops at Griswoldville with other skirmishes occurring at Macon, Gordon, Eatonton and Clinton, Georgia. None of these actions significantly hampered Sherman’s advance.

Tuesday November 22, 1864
Federal Major General Henry W. Slocum’s wing of Major General William T. Sherman’s arm occupied the Georgia state capital at Milledgeville. Brigadier General Judson Kilpatrick and Major General Oliver O. Howard were in or near Gordon. The Georgia legislature passed a levy en masse for troops and then fled. Georgia was now powerless to halt the Federals.

In the Confederate advance towards Nashville, fighting broke out at Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. Federal Brigadier General John M. Schofield then pulled his forces back north from Pulaski toward Columbia, since the Confederates were in a position to flank him and get in his rear.

Minor skirmishing flared at Front Royal and Rude’s Hill, Virginia.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of November 16-22, 1864
Active units:
1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Participated in Major General William T. Sherman’s “March to the Sea” until December 10, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Duvall’s Bluff, Arkansas until May 13, 1865.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Participated in Major General William T. Sherman’s “March to the Sea” until December 10, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Nashville, Tennessee until December 15, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On provost duty at St. Louis, Missouri until January 29, 1865.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Nashville, Tennessee until December 15, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Murfreesboro, Tennessee until December 5, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Nashville, Tennessee until December 15, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – En route to Nashville, Tennessee for duty until November 30, 1864.

11th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Assigned to duty guarding the line of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad from Nashville to the Kentucky line. Companies E, G, and I were at Gallatin, Tennessee. Company A was at Buck Lodge. Company B at Edgefield Junction. Company C at Richland. Company D at Sandersville. Company H was at Mitchellsville. The location of companies F and K are unknown at this time. The regiment remained on duty at these locations until June 25, 1865.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – Engaged in frontier and patrol duty between Forts Wadsworth, Abercrombie, Ripley and Ridgely with headquarters at Fort Snelling, until November 17, 1865.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Engaged in frontier and patrol duty between Forts Wadsworth, Abercrombie, Ripley and Ridgely with headquarters at Fort Snelling until May 1866.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry - Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie. Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina. Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Heavy Artillery Battery – Organized at St. Paul and Rochester until February 1865.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – Participated in Major General William T. Sherman’s “March to the Sea” until December 10, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty as infantry at Fort Irwin, Defenses of Chattanooga until March 30, 1865.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections on duty at Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Fort Sisseton until May 1865.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I – Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units:
1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.